Don't just sit there, say something.   If you wanted a tumblelog that made sense, you missed your exit about 10,000 miles ago, because I'm here with little or no practical purpose.
I make vague connections of totally random things to my daily life. I don't cater to normalcy. I am a fan of Doctor Who, M*A*S*H, Hogan's Heroes, Stargate, etc. etc. etc. I shun swear words, innuendo, and transparent stupidity. I rant about meaningless, moot points for lengthy amounts of time. I over-worry about everything. I post what I post because I darn well feel like it. So, is this your exit?

twitter.com/Jenny_that_girl:

    "[The German people] suffered a crushing defeat in 1918 and no one was there to give them a helping hand. They had been deeply humiliated and left with no friends to comfort them. It was at this point, at this decisive moment when the lack of understanding on the part of their neighbors left them dispossessed, scorned and offended, that an ambitious and cruel human being—a maniac, an inhuman brute—arose and cajoled them with his empty verbosity."
    Operation GARBO: The personal story of the most successful double agent of World War II
    — 4 days ago
    #Operation GARBO  #spy  #World War II  #Juan Pujol  #FUSAG 
    "Witness, if you will…squat."
    Jack O’Neill, “One False Step”
    — 6 days ago
    #Stargate SG-1 
    "That’s positively brilliant, Frank! Why, I bet by the time you’re through, a lot of rats are gonna have to be fitted for glasses!"
    Hawkeye Pierce, “Soldier of the Month”
    — 6 days ago
    #M*A*S*H 
    I derived a nice amount of nostalgic joy from assembling this set…it’s 12 years old. I’m a kid again! #LEGO (at Harris Residence)

    I derived a nice amount of nostalgic joy from assembling this set…it’s 12 years old. I’m a kid again! #LEGO (at Harris Residence)

    — 2 months ago with 4 notes
    #lego 
    mapsbynik:


Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population
A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.
Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading
Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.
Map observations
The map tends to highlight two types of areas:
places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.
Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.
Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.
At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.
Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.
Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.
In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.
Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.
::
Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.
I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?
Errata
The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.
::
©mapsbynik 2014 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth Made with Tilemill USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

    mapsbynik:

    Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

    A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

    Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading

    Quick update: If you’re the kind of map lover who cares about cartographic accuracy, check out the new version which fixes the Gulf of California. If you save this map for your own projects, please use this one instead.

    Map observations

    The map tends to highlight two types of areas:

    • places where human habitation is physically restrictive or impossible, and
    • places where human habitation is prohibited by social or legal convention.

    Water features such lakes, rivers, swamps and floodplains are revealed as places where it is hard for people to live. In addition, the mountains and deserts of the West, with their hostility to human survival, remain largely void of permanent population.

    Of the places where settlement is prohibited, the most apparent are wilderness protection and recreational areas (such as national and state parks) and military bases. At the national and regional scales, these places appear as large green tracts surrounded by otherwise populated countryside.

    At the local level, city and county parks emerge in contrast to their developed urban and suburban surroundings. At this scale, even major roads such as highways and interstates stretch like ribbons across the landscape.

    Commercial and industrial areas are also likely to be green on this map. The local shopping mall, an office park, a warehouse district or a factory may have their own Census Blocks. But if people don’t live there, they will be considered “uninhabited”. So it should be noted that just because a block is unoccupied, that does not mean it is undeveloped.

    Perhaps the two most notable anomalies on the map occur in Maine and the Dakotas. Northern Maine is conspicuously uninhabited. Despite being one of the earliest regions in North America to be settled by Europeans, the population there remains so low that large portions of the state’s interior have yet to be politically organized.

    In the Dakotas, the border between North and South appears to be unexpectedly stark. Geographic phenomena typically do not respect artificial human boundaries. Throughout the rest of the map, state lines are often difficult to distinguish. But in the Dakotas, northern South Dakota is quite distinct from southern North Dakota. This is especially surprising considering that the county-level population density on both sides of the border is about the same at less than 10 people per square mile.

    Finally, the differences between the eastern and western halves of the contiguous 48 states are particularly stark to me. In the east, with its larger population, unpopulated places are more likely to stand out on the map. In the west, the opposite is true. There, population centers stand out against the wilderness.

    ::

    Ultimately, I made this map to show a different side of the United States. Human geographers spend so much time thinking about where people are. I thought I might bring some new insight by showing where they are not, adding contrast and context to the typical displays of the country’s population geography.

    I’m sure I’ve all but scratched the surface of insight available from examining this map. There’s a lot of data here. What trends and patterns do you see?

    Errata

    • The Gulf of California is missing from this version. I guess it got filled in while doing touch ups. Oops. There’s a link to a corrected map at the top of the post.
    • Some islands may be missing if they were not a part of the waterbody data sets I used.

    ::

    ©mapsbynik 2014
    Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
    Block geography and population data from U.S. Census Bureau
    Water body geography from National Hydrology Dataset and Natural Earth
    Made with Tilemill
    USGS National Atlas Equal Area Projection

    — 4 months ago with 6958 notes
    #I apparently live in no-man's land  #what could the US population eventually amount to  #this is why the world is so messed up 
    
    I’m watching Unending



“Old spoiler alert: The Goa’uld weren’t the Gate Builders.”



    
    
        Check-in to
    
    
    Unending on GetGlue.com

    I’m watching Unending

    “Old spoiler alert: The Goa’uld weren’t the Gate Builders.”

    Check-in to Unending on GetGlue.com

    — 6 months ago
    
    I just unlocked the 3, 2, 1… Launch! sticker on GetGlue



    
    
        21051 others have also unlocked the 3, 2, 1… Launch! sticker on GetGlue.com
    
    



    Check in, unlock digital stickers, comment, doodle, and react to TV moments of your favorite shows! Now available for iPhone. Share this one proudly. It’s from our friends at tvtag.

    I just unlocked the 3, 2, 1… Launch! sticker on GetGlue

    21051 others have also unlocked the 3, 2, 1… Launch! sticker on GetGlue.com

    Check in, unlock digital stickers, comment, doodle, and react to TV moments of your favorite shows! Now available for iPhone. Share this one proudly. It’s from our friends at tvtag.

    — 7 months ago
    The stuff that comes out of my head…I don’t know whether to be pleased or perturbed. (at Harris Residence)

    The stuff that comes out of my head…I don’t know whether to be pleased or perturbed. (at Harris Residence)

    — 9 months ago
    I put my Cyrus and Reese pins on my purse to show off my love for Animal Crossing: New Leaf. I don’t know why I didn’t think of this before; it’s brilliant.

    I put my Cyrus and Reese pins on my purse to show off my love for Animal Crossing: New Leaf. I don’t know why I didn’t think of this before; it’s brilliant.

    — 10 months ago with 2 notes
    #acnl  #Animal Crossing: New Leaf  #Cyrus  #Reese 

    Do you have the fourth QR code to this set? If you do, PLEASE send it to me. I seem to have lost it, and the correct search term to find it among the vast corridors of the Internet continues to elude me. Please help a fellow Whovian and Animal Crossing lover out.

    — 10 months ago with 11 notes
    #Animal Crossing: New Leaf  #Doctor Who  #11th Doctor  #QR Code  #HELP 
    dobuttsu-no-mori:

HOUSE COMPLETE


That one part looks a bit like Klingon.
And Lyle…poor, poor Lyle.

    dobuttsu-no-mori:

    HOUSE COMPLETE

    That one part looks a bit like Klingon.

    And Lyle…poor, poor Lyle.

    (via lovelyphone-deactivated20131012)

    — 1 year ago with 6 notes
    #Animal Crossing: New Leaf  #Tom Nook  #Lyle  #Star Trek 
    coricrossing:

rochejii:

Where do Reese and Cyrus get all their money???
Screenshot source

thats probs why hes asleep all the time. too stressed out from reese

DYING 😂

    coricrossing:

    rochejii:

    Where do Reese and Cyrus get all their money???

    Screenshot source

    thats probs why hes asleep all the time. too stressed out from reese

    DYING 😂

    (Source: cross-fiction, via lovelyphone-deactivated20131012)

    — 1 year ago with 14227 notes
    #Animal Crossing: New Leaf  #Cyrus  #Reese  #Shark